To    :        Town of Ithaca Planning Board

Re    :       Recommended Changes to Draft t-GEIS Scope

Date :       January 3, 2006

 

We would like to thank the Planning Board for the opportunity to comment on the draft scope of the Town of Ithaca-Cornell University transportation-related GEIS currently under review.

 

While we have a number of specific recommendations, our basic concern is simple. The stated purpose of the study is to "address transportation impacts on the community surrounding the campus related to an increasing population traveling to Cornell." Yet every mention of neighborhoods, roads or intersections in the draft is in relation to their impact on the flow of traffic, and not vice versa.

 

Our recommendations are intended to remedy this. They are the product of much neighborhood discussion and many hours of work. We thank you in advance for considering them carefully, and look forward to working with the Town and Cornell in a truly inclusive, forward-looking process.

 

 

Sincerely,

 

Name                                  Organization              

 

Darcy Binns                         Forest Home Improvement Association

Michael Decatur                   Cornell Heights Neighborhood Association

Elizabeth Sanders                Forest Home Improvement Association

Joanna Luks                        University Hill Neighborhood Association

Joanne K. Trutko                  Collegetown Neighborhood Council      

Trevor J. Pinch                     Forest Home Improvement Association

Christine Becraft                  Ellis Hollow Community Center

Jonathan Miller                    Forest Home Improvement Association

 

 


 

 

Note:  Proposed additions appear in bold, proposed deletions in strike-thru.

 


Transportation-focused Generic Environmental Impact Statement (t-GEIS)

For

Ten-year Transportation Impact Mitigation Strategies (TIMS)

 

November 15, 2005  January 3, 2006

 

Introduction and Background

 

Purpose of the Transportation-focused Generic Environmental Impact Statement (t-GEIS)

The purpose of the transportation-focused GEIS is to identify, examine and evaluate Cornell University’s transportation-related impacts and possible mitigations for hypothetical Cornell University population growth scenarios, over the next decade. The GEIS is a tool available under the New York State Environmental Quality Review Act, commonly referred to as SEQR. Unlike a project-specific Environmental Impact Statement, a GEIS is flexible enough to explore hypothetical or alternative scenarios. A major objective of the t-GEIS is to develop ways to reduce the number of trips by motor vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods on their way to and from Cornell University.

 

Purpose of Scoping and the Scope

Scoping is the process by which the Lead Agency, the Planning Board of the Town of Ithaca in this instance, identifies the significant issues related to the proposed action which are to be addressed in the draft GEIS. Where possible, the content and level of detail of the analysis, the range of alternatives, the mitigation measures needed to minimize or eliminate adverse impacts, and the identification of non-relevant issues are included in the scope. (See 6 NYCRR Part 617.2 (af)) Scoping is not intended to be a forum for discussion of the merits of potential solutions.

 

The Scope is an outline of what will be addressed in the GEIS.

 

What the t-GEIS Will Not Address

The t-GEIS will not recommend ways to accommodate an increase in traffic flow through residential neighborhoods, but will instead explore and recommend ways to limit this traffic and reduce its impacts. The t-GEIS will not analyze visual resources, storm water, wetlands, plants and animals, air quality, housing, or utilities, and historical and archaeological resources. The t-GEIS will also not analyze specific future projects. Their impacts will be evaluated on a project-by-project basis as specific project proposals are brought forward and undergo site plan review and SEQR. To the extent that the completed t-GEIS addresses transportation-related impacts of future project proposals, it will be used as part of their individual environmental reviews, but project-specific information on transportation will still be supplied. Neighborhoods will be active partners not only in assessing the impact of current and anticipated scenarios, but also in proposing and selecting among mitigation strategies.

 

Further Information and Process for Public Input

The following opportunities are provided for public input.

 

Web Site: The project web site will be updated regularly with information, public documents, and all public meeting dates, times, and locations. Questions and comments can be sent via the web site as well.

http://www.tgeisproject.org

 

Public Meetings and Hearings: All meetings of the Lead Agency, the Planning Board of the Town of Ithaca, are public meetings. The Lead Agency will also conduct public hearings to obtain input during the scoping phase, at the draft GEIS phase, and at the final GEIS phase. The Planning Board gives public notice of its meetings and hearings.

 

Public Comment: In addition to comments received at public hearings, written comments can be submitted to the Lead Agency during announced public review periods and will be recorded as part of the public comment.

 

Stakeholder Input: A comprehensive list of stakeholder groups is being identified by Cornell. Stakeholder groups will be contacted to contribute to relevant aspects of the study. For example, Cornell or the project consultants could ask stakeholder groups to participate in surveys and focus groups.

Transportation-focused Generic Environmental Impact Statement (t-GEIS)

For

Ten-year Transportation Impact Mitigation Strategies (TIMS)

 

Preliminary Draft Scope

Prepared by t-GEIS Project Team

November 15, 2005  January 3, 2006

 

 

I.    Executive Summary

 

      1.1      Summary of Impacts and Mitigations Matrix

 

II.   Description of the Proposed Action

 

This transportation-focused Generic Environmental Impact Statement (t-GEIS) is being written pursuant to the New York State and Town of Ithaca Environmental Quality Review laws to study Ten-year Transportation Impact Mitigation Strategies (TIMS) which will identify, examine and evaluate Cornell University’s transportation-related impacts and possible mitigations for hypothetical Cornell University population growth scenarios, over the next decade. For purposes of this project, the term Cornell population is not limited to people who are resident on the Cornell campus. It is largely the people who live off campus and travel to Cornell (primarily staff, faculty, and graduate students) who affect transportation in the community surrounding the campus. Travel to the main campus will be analyzed in order to understand transportation impacts on the community from an increase in the Cornell population. The main campus for the purposes of this study is illustrated in Figure 1: Area of Hypothetical Population Growth for t-GEIS.

 

TIMS will outline ways to reduce avoid or compensate for adverse transportation impacts of potential Cornell University population growth over the next decade. The purpose is to ensure that the livability of the residential neighborhoods surrounding the Cornell campus is not compromised by the growth of the University.  TIMS may include recommendations for: transportation demand management; multi-modal transportation strategies including pedestrian, bicycle, transit, rail and parking; access and circulation modifications, including traffic-calming and diversion of traffic from residential neighborhoods; relocation or modification of existing or planned traffic-generating University facilities; and zoning changes for campus land; and other possible measures. TIMS will be updated in five-year cycles. The specific mitigation measures to be implemented will be selected by the affected municipalities, in consultation with the impacted neighborhoods.

 

During the preparation of the t-GEIS the public and municipal agencies will have full opportunity to review the draft t-GEIS and provide comments about the transportation impacts of a range of hypothetical Cornell population growth scenarios, their possible mitigations, and alternatives. The t-GEIS will provide a context for a comprehensive evaluation of the transportation impacts of potential Cornell population growth over the next decade. The mitigations sections of the t-GEIS, in particular, will inform and shape TIMS.

 

The t-GEIS will also assist the lead and involved agencies in environmental reviews of the transportation-related impacts of individual Cornell projects in the future. To this end, traffic counts taken during the last thirty years will be correlated with various measures of Cornell’s size during this same time period, in order to indicate how traffic volumes and number of truck deliveries are a function of: number of Cornell employees and commuting students; gross square footage (gsf) of building space on campus; number of on-campus residents (students and families); and other relevant measures. These historical relationships will be used to help estimate the traffic impact of each individual Cornell project proposal during environmental review.

 

      2.1 Project Purpose, Need and Benefits

            2.1.1      Background and History

            2.1.2      Cornell and Public Need for the Proposed Action

            2.1.3      Objectives

            2.1.4      Benefits

 

III. Existing Transportation Systems and Known/Planned Transportation Initiatives

 

As the population that travels to Cornell increases, existing transportation systems will be affected. This section will include a description of the existing transportation systems used for accessing the campus. In Section IV potentially significant traffic impacts will be analyzed for three hypothetical Cornell population growth scenarios, plus the no-growth in population scenario. Practicable mitigation measures that can be used to avoid or minimize some or all of these potential impacts will be identified and discussed in Section V. Connectivity to alternative modes of transportation including pedestrian, bicycle, and transit will be analyzed with the goal of increased use of these modes, and decreased use of single occupancy vehicles.

 

Pre-existing traffic counts will be used where possible. The study will examine:

 

      3.1 Existing Transportation Systems

 

            3.1.1      Relationship to Other Current Long-Range Transportation Planning Efforts

                  A.      Adopted Plans

                             1.   Local municipalities’ plans

                              • Town of Dryden

                              • Town of Ithaca

                              • Town of Lansing

                              • Village of Lansing

                              • City of Ithaca Comprehensive Plan and Amendments (Area Studies)

                             2.      Tompkins County Comprehensive Plan

                             3.   Cayuga Lake Waterfront Plan (LWRP)

                             4.   ITCTC 2025 Long Range Transportation Plan

                             5.   ITCTC 2005 – 2010 Transportation Improvement Program

                             6.   Town of Ithaca Transportation Plan (pending)

                             7.   TCAT Strategic Plan

                  B.      Planning Studies

                             1.   North Campus Gateway

                             2.   ITCTC Northeast Subarea Transportation Study (NESTS)

                             3.   ITCTC NESTS Transit Planning Project (NTTP)

                             4.   ITCTC Freight Transportation Study (FTS)

                             5.   ITCTC Transportation Trail/Corridor Study

                             6.   TCAT Service and Fare Consolidation Study

                             7.   Forest Home Traffic Calming Plan (pending)

                             8.      Tompkins County Travel Survey

                             9.      Cornell University Employee Commuter Studies

                             10.      Cornell University’s plans and studies for campus development

                                   11.            Cornell University’s plans and studies for transportation, parking and access

 

            3.1.2      Relationship Between Land Use and Transportation in Tompkins County

 

            3.1.3      Single Occupancy Vehicle Trip Reduction Programs

                  3.1.3.1      Pedestrian Circulation

                               a.        Description of existing and known/planned pedestrian facilities providing access to campus

                  3.1.3.2      Bicycle Circulation

                               a.        Description of existing and known/planned bicycle facilities providing access to campus

                  3.1.3.3      Transit Service

                             a.      Description of existing bus system

                             b.      Description of existing Park and Ride programs

                             c.      Description of existing paratransit service

                  3.1.3.4      Transportation Demand Management Programs (TDMP)

                             a.      Description of existing TDM programs at Cornell University

                              1.   Zone 1 Privileges

                              2.      OmniRide

                              3.      Occasional Parker

                              4.      RideShare

                              5.      Guaranteed Ride Home

                              6.   Free bus passes for students

                              7.   Van-pooling

                              8.      Telecommuting

                              9.   Flex-time

                              10.      Parking Restrictions

                                   

            3.1.4      Vehicular Circulation

            The t-GEIS will focus on weekday p.m.-peak-hour, worst-case traffic and will not study but will also seek to limit weekend or weekday, non-peak-hour traffic. Intersection analysis will be done for p.m. peak-hour trips only, which typically yield the highest volume (worst-case) traffic, although in certain instances analyzing a.m. peak-hour traffic also will be appropriate. Intersections will be sorted by corridor to see if any would yield substantially redundant information within the same corridor.

 

                        3.1.4.1            Description of existing vehicular circulation on corridors that provide access to the Cornell campus.

                        3.1.4.2            Description of existing traffic conditions at intersections that meet the following criteria:

                               a.        the intersection is on a major approach roadway providing vehicular access to the campus, and

                               b.        the intersection is signalized or has STOP sign control along the major roadway in the direction of approach and/or departure from campus, and

                               c.        the intersection is generally within one mile of the main campus boundary, and

                               d.        Cornell population growth is estimated to increase the future year volume of traffic on any approach of an intersection meeting the above criteria by:

                           1.   15% or more, or

                           2.   10% or more for any intersection a local government, county government, NYSDOT, ITCTC, or other member of the Resource Committee has demonstrated is at existing Level of Service (LOS) C or D, or

                           3.   5% or more for any intersection a local government, county government, NYSDOT, ITCTC, or other member of the Resource Committee has demonstrated is at existing Level of Service (LOS) E or worse.

 

                                   List of intersections to be evaluated according to the above criteria is shown in Table 1: List of Intersections to Be Evaluated According to Criteria.

 

                                   Locations of intersections listed in Table 1 are shown relative to the area of hypothetical population growth for the t-GEIS in Figure 2: Intersections to be Evaluated According to Criteria and Figure 3: Intersections to be Evaluated According to Criteria, Enlargement.

 

                  3.1.4.3      Description of existing service and delivery vehicle traffic

                  3.1.4.4      Description of Cornell commuting traffic in surrounding residential neighborhoods:

                             • Belle Sherman/Bryant Park

                             • Cayuga Heights

                             • Collegetown

                             • Cornell Heights

                             • Forest Home

                             • University Hill

                             • Varna

                             • Ellis Hollow

                             • Pine Tree Road/Snyder Hill Road/Honness Lane

                        3.1.4.5            General description of existing traffic conditions and mitigation strategies for special events

                        3.1.4.6            Description of existing collision data for corridors that provide access to the Cornell campus

 

            3.1.5      Parking

                  3.1.5.1      Description of existing parking for students, faculty, staff, and visitors

                             a.   On-campus

                             b.   Off-campus

                              1.   On-street and off-street parking

                              2.      Residential parking permit programs, meters and other regulations

                  3.1.5.2      Description of contemplated University parking facilities

 

            3.1.6      Neighborhood Livability

                        3.1.6.1            Description of existing traffic impacts to surrounding residential neighborhoods.  Characteristics to note and measure include:

                             • Neighborhood demographics

                             • Housing density and set-back

                             • Vehicle speeds and volumes

                             • Percent trucks and buses

                             • Collision data

                             • Cornell-related parking

                             • Pedestrian activity and presence of pedestrian facilities

                             • Roadway width and gaps in traffic

                             • Sound level at shoulder/walkway and at median house set-back

                             • Air quality/pollution

                             • Streetscape aesthetics and historic character

 

            3.1.7      Growth of Cornell University and its Traffic

                        3.1.7.1            Measurements of Cornell’s growth during the past 30 years will be collected and presented, including:

                                   • Gross square footage (gsf) of building space on campus

                                   • Number of Cornell employees and the distribution of their home addresses

                                   • Number of commuting students and the distribution of their home addresses

                                   • Number of on-campus resident students

                                   • Number of on-campus student families

                                   • Number of on-campus parking spaces

                                   • Number of transit buses serving campus

                                   • Number of truck deliveries and their travel routes to campus

                                   • Number of construction vehicles accessing campus

                                   • Traffic counts on campus

                                   • Traffic counts in residential neighborhoods surrounding campus

                                   • Traffic counts at the periphery of the Area of Hypothetical Population Growth

 

IV. Population Growth Scenarios and Transportation Impacts

      (Note: The impact analysis will include short-term, long-term and cumulative impacts.)

 

      4.0 Traffic Implications of Cornell Growth

 

            4.0.1 Estimation of traffic increases based on size (gsf, number of employees, etc.) of proposed Cornell developments

                        4.0.1.1            Increase in automotive traffic generated by Cornell-related households (faculty, staff, students)

                               a.        Commuting trips to Cornell

                               b.        Other trips generated by Cornell-related households (see ITE Trip Generation Manual)

                  4.0.1.2      Increase in transit vehicle traffic

                             a.   Transit buses serving campus

                             b.   Transit buses serving other household trip needs

                  4.0.1.3      Increase in service and delivery vehicle traffic

                             a.      Deliveries to Cornell campus

                               b.        Deliveries to area businesses serving Cornell-related households

                  4.0.1.4      Increase in construction vehicle traffic

                  4.0.1.5      Increase in off-campus parking in residential areas

 

      4.1      Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenarios Over the Next Decade.

                 Hypothetical Cornell population growth scenarios will be studied for the main campus. Actual growth and impacts (and appropriate mitigation measures) will depend upon individual projects proposed by Cornell.

 

            4.1.1 Scenario 1: no growth; population remains the same as it currently is

            4.1.2 Scenario 2: population increase of 0.1% per year (approximately 300 persons over the next 10 years; based on historical Cornell population growth from 1990-1999)

            4.1.3 Scenario 3: population increase of 0.5% per year (approximately 1,500 persons over the next 10 years; based on 30-year historical Cornell population growth from 1975-2005)

            4.1.4 Scenario 4: population increase of 1.0% per year (approximately 3,000 persons over the next 10 years; based on historical Cornell population growth from 1980-1989)

            4.1.5 Other growth scenarios not evaluated

            4.1.5 Scenario 5: population increase of 3.0% per year (approximately 9,000 persons over the next ten years; based on historical Cornell gsf growth from 1900-2000)

            4.1.6 Scenario 6: population increase of 5.0% per year (approximately 15,000 persons over the next ten years; based on worst case scenario, beyond historical growth rates)

 

      4.2      Transportation Systems

 

            4.2.1 Relationship of Each Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenario to Other Current Long-Range Transportation Planning Efforts

 

            4.2.2 Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenarios and Relationship to Transportation and Land Use

 

            4.2.3 Impact of Each Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenario on Existing Single Occupancy Vehicle Trip Reduction Programs

                  4.2.3.1      Pedestrian Circulation

                               a.        Description of the transportation-related impact on pedestrian facilities providing access to campus

                               b.        Description of the transportation-related impacts on pedestrians themselves (safety, air quality, noise, aesthetics, etc)

                  4.2.3.2      Bicycle Circulation

                               a.        Description of the transportation-related impact on bicycle facilities providing access to campus

                               b.        Description of the transportation-related impacts on bicyclists themselves (safety, air quality, noise, aesthetics, etc)

                    4.2.3.3        Transit Service

                               a.        Description of the transportation-related impact on the existing bus system

                               b.        Description of the transportation-related impact on existing Park and Ride programs

                               c.        Description of the transportation-related impact on existing paratransit service

                    4.2.3.4        Transportation Demand Management Programs (TDMP)

                               a.        Description of the transportation-related impact on existing TDM programs at Cornell University

                              1.   Zone 1 Privileges

                              2.      OmniRide

                              3.      Occasional Parker

                              4.      RideShare

                              5.      Guaranteed Ride Home

                              6.   Free bus passes for students

                              7.   Van-pooling

                              8.      Telecommuting

                              9.   Flex-time

                              10.      Parking Restrictions

 

            4.2.4 Impact of Each Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenario on Existing Vehicular Circulation

                        4.2.4.1. Description of increase in traffic on corridors serving the Cornell campus

                        4.2.4.2.            Description of impact on traffic conditions for intersections meeting criteria in 3.1.4.2 . Intersection analysis will be done for weekday p.m. peak-hour trips for the hypothetical population growth scenarios. In certain instances analyzing a.m. peak-hour traffic also will be appropriate. Intersections will be sorted by corridor to see if any would yield substantially redundant information within the same corridor.

                        4.2.4.3.            Description of impact on service and delivery vehicle traffic

                        4.2.4.4.            Description of impact on surrounding residential neighborhoods, including limits to through-traffic inherent to residential neighborhoods (stopped school buses, etc)

                        4.2.4.5.            General description of impact on traffic conditions and mitigation strategies for special events

 

            4.2.5 Impact of Each Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenario on Parking for Students, Faculty, Staff and Visitors

                        4.2.5.1.            On-campus

                        4.2.5.2.            Off-campus

                             a.   On-street parking

                             b.      Residential parking permit programs, meters and other regulations

 

      4.3      Neighborhood Livability

 

            4.3.1 Impact of Each Hypothetical Cornell Population Growth Scenario on Neighborhood Livability

                        4.3.1.1            Description of increase in automotive traffic and its impacts on residential neighborhoods

                               a.        Commuting trips to Cornell

                               b.        Other trips generated by Cornell-related households (see ITE Trip Generation Manual)

                        4.3.1.2            Description of increase in transit vehicle traffic and its impacts on residential neighborhoods

                        4.3.1.3            Description of increase in service and delivery vehicle traffic and its impacts on residential neighborhoods

                        4.3.1.4            Description of increase in construction vehicle traffic and its impacts on residential neighborhoods

                        4.3.1.5            Description of increase in Cornell-related parking and its impacts on residential neighborhoods

 

V.  Mitigations and Strategies

 

      5.1      Transportation Systems

 

            5.1.1 Potential Mitigation Strategies for Impacts to Single Occupancy Vehicle Trip Reduction Programs

                    5.1.1.1        Pedestrian Circulation

                               a.        Description of potential improvements to pedestrian facilities to enhance access to campus

                    5.1.1.2        Bicycle Circulation

                               a.        Description of potential improvements to bicycle facilities to enhance access to campus

                    5.1.1.3        Transit Service

                               a.        Description of potential improvements to the bus system

                               b.        Description of potential improvements for Park and Ride programs

                               c.        Description of potential improvements for paratransit service

                               d.        Description of potential development of light-rail service

                    5.1.1.4        Transportation Demand Management Programs (TDMP)

                               a.        Description of potential improvements or additions to TDM programs at Cornell University

                           1.   Potential free bus passes for students not requesting/receiving parking permits

                              2.   Zone 1 Privileges

                              3.      OmniRide

                              4.      Occasional Parker

                              5.      RideShare / Van-pooling

                              6.      Guaranteed Ride Home

                              7.      Telecommuting

                              8.   Flex-time

                              9.   Parking Cash-out

                              10. Other – i.e., Car sharing, Parking Restrictions, etc.

                              11. Fewer work days per week, without reducing total work hours

 

            5.1.2      Potential Mitigation Strategies for Impacts to Vehicular Circulation

                        5.1.2.1.            Description of potential mitigation strategies for roadways and intersections

                        5.1.2.2.            Description of potential mitigation strategies for service and delivery vehicle traffic

                        5.1.2.3.            Description of potential mitigation strategies for surrounding residential neighborhoods

                        5.1.2.4.            General description of potential mitigation strategies for special events

 

            5.1.3      Potential Mitigation Strategies for Impacts to Parking

                        5.1.3.1.            Description of potential mitigation strategies for parking for students, faculty, staff and visitors:

                             a.   On-campus

                             b.   Off-campus

                              1.   On-street parking

                           2.   Residential parking permit programs, meters and other regulations

 

            5.1.4      Mitigation Strategies Relative to Land Use and Transportation

 

      5.2      Neighborhood Livability

 

            5.2.1      Potential Mitigation Strategies For Impacts to Residential Neighborhoods

                  5.2.1.1      Automotive Vehicle Circulation

                               a.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the number of automotive vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods on both commuting and non-commuting trips

                               b.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the impact of remaining automotive vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                    5.2.1.2        Transit Service

                               a.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the number of transit vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                               b.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the impact of remaining transit vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                    5.2.1.3        Service and Delivery Vehicles

                               a.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the number of service and delivery vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                               b.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the impact of remaining service and delivery vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                    5.2.1.4        Construction Vehicles

                               a.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the number of construction vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                               b.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce the impact of remaining construction vehicles traveling through residential neighborhoods

                    5.2.1.5        Parking

                               a.        Description of potential mitigation measures to reduce Cornell-related parking in residential neighborhoods

 

VI.      Unavoidable Adverse Impacts

 

Adverse environmental effects in Section III that can be expected to occur regardless of the mitigation measures considered will be identified.

 

VII.      Alternatives to the Action

 

      7.1 No Action – Continue to evaluate transportation impacts on a case-by-case basis

 

VIII.      Irreversible and Irretrievable Commitment of Resources

 

Those resources listed in Section IV that will be consumed, converted, or made unavailable for future use will be identified.

 

IX. Growth Inducing Aspects of the Proposed Action

(Transportation Issues Only)

 

X.  Impacts of the Proposed Action on Use and Conservation of Energy

(Transportation Issues Only)

Transportation-focused Generic Environmental Impact Statement (t-GEIS)

For

Ten-year Transportation Impact Mitigation Strategies

 

Table 1: List of Intersections to be Evaluated According to Criteria

 

1.   Forest Home Dr & Warren Rd

2.   Forest Home Dr (including adjacent bridge) & Pleasant Grove Rd

3.   Warren Rd & Hanshaw Rd

4.   Pleasant Grove Rd & Hanshaw Rd

5.      Triphammer Rd & Hanshaw Rd

6.   Forest Home Dr & Judd Falls Rd

7.      Triphammer Rd & George Jessup/Dearborn Pl

8.      Triphammer Rd & Wait Ave

9.   Thurston Ave & Wait Ave

10. Thurston Ave/East Ave & University Ave/Forest Home Rd, signalized

11. Stewart Ave Bridge & Fall Creek Drive

12. Stewart Ave & University Ave

13. Stewart Ave & Buffalo St

14. Lake St & University Ave

15. Lake St & Lincoln St

16. Campus Rd/South Rd & Stewart Ave

17. Court St & Aurora St, signalized

18. Seneca St/Seneca Way & N Aurora St, signalized

19. State St (SR 79) & Seneca/Green St, signalized

20. State St (SR 79) & Stewart Ave, signalized

21. State St (SR 79) & Mitchell St (SR 366)

22. Ithaca Rd (SR 366) & Mitchell St

23. Cornell St & Mitchell St

24. Cornell St & State St (SR 79), signalized

25. Dryden Rd & College Rd, signalized

26. Dryden Rd (SR 366) & Cornell St & Maple Ave, signalized

27. Dryden Rd (SR 366) & Hoy Rd

28. Dryden Rd (SR 366) & Pine Tree Rd

29. Dryden Rd (SR 366) & SR 13, signalized

30. Ellis Hollow Rd & Pine Tree Rd, signalized

31. Slaterville Rd (SR 79) & Pine Tree Rd

32. Buffalo St & Cayuga St, signalized

33. South Aurora St. (SR 96B) & Prospect St.

34. West Buffalo St (SR 96 & 89) & Fulton St (SR 13), signalized

35. West Buffalo St (SR 96 & 89) & Meadow St (SR 13), signalized

36. West State St (SR 79) & Fulton St (SR 13), signalized

37. West State St (SR 79) & Meadow St (SR 13), signalized

38. South Meadow St (SR 13), Elmira Road, Old Elmira Rd, signalized

39. Sapsucker Woods Rd/Brown Rd & SR 13

40. Warren Rd & SR 13

41. North Triphammer Rd & SR 34B

42. Freese Rd/Mt. Pleasant Rd & SR 366

43. Game Farm Rd & SR 366

44. Judd Falls Rd & SR 366

45. Honness Lane & SR 79

46. Honness Lane & Pine Tree Rd

47. Pine Tree Rd & Snyder Hill Rd

48. King Rd & SR 96B

49. Enfield Falls Rd (SR 327) & SR 13

50. SR 13 & SR 13A

51/52.  SR 13 & SR 34

53. SR 79 & SR 13A

54. Caldwell Rd & Forest Home Drive (and adjacent bridge)

55.      Triphammer Rd & Pyramid Dr (Pyramid Mall entrance)

56.      Triphammer Rd & WB SR 13 Ramps

57.      Triphammer Rd & EB SR 13 Ramps

58.      Triphammer Rd & Savannah Park Driveway

59. SR 96 & Dates Drive (Cayuga Medical Center), signalized

60. Caldwell Road & SR 366, signalized